Brixton Prison information

Brixton

The original buildings date from 1819. In 1862 the prison was sold to the Government and converted into a prison for females. Twenty years later it was again converted, this time as a military prison, and in 1898, when it was returned to the Prison Commissioners, the buildings were enlarged and improved and made the trial and remand prison for the whole of the London area. 

In July 2012, following a long history as a remand prison, Brixton became a resettlement prison, housing category C/D prisoners., it no longer serves any courts. 

Address:

Jebb Avenue
Brixton
London
SW2 5XF

Tel: 020 8588 6000
Fax: 020 8588 6283

Governor: Edmond Tullett

Operational capacity:  798 as of 24th August 2008

Accommodation:

Our population break down is as follows: 

  • A Wing - 215 prisoners including the Drug Recovery Wing
  • B Wing - 150 prisoners
  • C Wing - 133 Category D prisoners
  • D Wing - 50 Category D prisoners
  • G Wing - 250 Category C vulnerable offenders
Brixton is in transition at the moment. It is receiving significant investment in new water mains, fire alarms, as well as refurbishment of existing education space and the building of a new regime building. Together this will hugely enhance our ability to deliver education and workshop activity, and help prisoners prepare for release and reducing reoffending. 

HMP Brixton resettlement initiatives 

A4e: Provides education programmes such as ESOL (English for students of other Languages), maths, English, Writing for Purpose, Radio Production, Health and Safety, Graphics, Retail and Customer Services, Fashion, Business Enterprise, Business Administration, Peer Mentoring, Cleaning Services, Work Ready Programme, Horticulture, ITQ, Open University and Distance Learning.  

Drug services: (Counselling, Assessment, Referral, Advice and Throughcare) services at HMP BRIXTON. This service is available to anyone that misuses drugs and wants support addressing their drug use. SOTP:  for G-wing’s vulnerable prisoners. 

Jobcentre Plus: Services include providing referrals to work programme and advance claim to benefit for prisoners who are due for release for up to 8 weeks, including community care grants and jobseekers allowance.

St. Giles Trust: Helping with housing advice and resettlement services and also offering a course in Advice and Guidance.

Phoenix Futures (formerly ADFAM): The Phoenix Futures Family Support Service provides support and guidance to the families and prisoners affected by substance misuse, the men can refer their family members themselves but most of the referrals come via their Substance Misuse worker.

Spurgeons: Providing support to families and friends through Visitors Centres at London Prisons.

The Clink:  The Clink Charity, in partnership with HMPS, offers prisoners training towards gaining a nationally recognised NVQ qualification. Upon release, the Clink Charity helps graduates find employment within the catering and hospitality industry, and mentors them weekly for 6-12 months to help them reintegrate back into society and not reoffend.

Bad boys bakery: employing 12 prisoners but about to ramp up delivery of the lemon curd treacle cakes from 15 Café Nero outlets in the Brixton area to 190 throughout London which will involve not only making the product but distributing it.

Chaplaincy: Prisoners are given access to faith based services within the establishment. ‘FAITH IN THE FUTURE’:  a six week, full-time, Christian resettlement course.  It runs for 30 men, five times a year and covers victim awareness, budgeting, parenting, communication skills and employability.  We discuss moral issues and have a module called Christianity Explored.  The course is open to men of any faith and who are willing to explore resettlement issues from a Christian perspective.

Radio station: The PRA is an award-winning education charity that engages hard-to-reach prisoners in the production of radio programming and encourages the prison radio audience to become active learners, engaging with the range of advice, support services and opportunities available to them.

Keepout: The Crime Diversion Scheme.
 
Other partners: We have already established links with various external partners, such as Bounceback (Painting and Decorating), Sue Ryder and Handmade Alliance in terms of providing work and employment opportunities, and we hold regular resettlement events to continue to build our partnerships.
HM Prison Service

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